Our Dog

Paul & Money when she was just a puppy.

Paul & Money when she was just a puppy.

While I was waiting for my mom to come out of recovery at the hospital on Friday (see “Mom’s Knee Replacement” post) I received a call from our veterinarian to discuss the blood work from my dog’s appointment the day before.  My dog is 13 years old.  She is a black lab/dalmation mix and she is such an important part of our family.  She has had two knee replacements a couple of years ago or so and has done really well!  My husband took her to the vet because she just hasn’t been eating right and has started losing weight.  The vet did not have good news. 

Her blood levels were “alarming” and they believed she was experiencing kidney failure.  I was horrified and still am!  She seems like she is doing so well!  She’s happy and playful at times and is perky and affectionate.  She is a little more tired, and doesn’t eat or drink as much as she had been, but I figured she was just getting older.  Kidney failure is not at all what we expected to hear.

Money

Money

I left the hospital with my mom still in recovery.  Thank God for my Aunt Jeanne who had just gotten back to the hospital.  She would tend to my mom while I found my husband so we could figure out what to do next.  They said she needed “intensive care” treatment as soon as possible and we should take her to the hospital.  When my husband finally got home I was a mess.  I had been crying for some time and sitting on the floor with my girl (her name is “Money” by the way.  I didn’t get a vote on the name, but it fits her after all this time.).  He was stunned as I was but held it together and took her to the hospital.

He brought her home that night with a treatment regimen.  She’s on Pepcid to help reduce acid, she’s on antibiotics for a UTI, and then there’s the “fluid” treatment.  We actually have to “push” 1000 cc’s of saline into the scruff of her neck.  Yes, I said one thousand!  We poke her with a rather large needle and squeeze the IV bag to get the fluid in.  I guess this is the canine version of dialisys.  When we’re done she has a lump on her neck about the size of a cantelope filled with saline.  Not a pleasant experience for any of us. 

Money & Cash watch the birds.

Money & Cash watch the birds.

Yesterday was our first attempt to do this.  It was going well at first, but then she jumped up and the needle popped out.  It was devastating because now we’d have to stick her again to finish the treatment.  My husband did it but she was so upset by then that we couldn’t finish.  For the rest of the night she wouldn’t go anywhere near Paul.  Even this morning she isn’t trusting him completely.  It breaks my heart to see her act like this.  Paul is the one person she has trusted completely for all of her life, and to see that relationship suffer now, at this point of her life is just sad.

I called the vet to see if there were any other options.  “No.”  We have to do it!  I feel so bad about this.  If we don’t give her all of this fluid then the toxins will fill her body and she will feel very ill.  They don’t know if this will prolong her life any, but it will make her feel better.  I sure hope this goes better tonight.  It’s killing my husband to have to do this, but he knows we have to.   I’m going to try to be the one to stick her tonight so he can be the good guy.  I’m actually pretty weak when it comes to needles, but I have to try. 

Money with her baby ducks.  She was such a good mom!

Money with her baby ducks. She was such a good mom!

We can’t bear the thought of losing our girl.  I know it’s inevitable but she doesn’t even seem sick right now.  We’re certainly thankful for that.  This is not going to be easy.

My "baby girl".

My "baby girl".

Advertisements